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Media release: 
19/01/2018

The results from the largest ever study of septic shock could improve treatment for critically ill patients and save health systems worldwide hundreds of millions of dollars each year.

Media release: 
15/01/2018

Girls who start their periods before they turn 12 are at greater risk of developing heart disease and stroke in later life, according to a new study of nearly 300,000 women in the UK by The George Institute for Global Health at the University of Oxford. 

Dr. Devaki Nambiar joined The George Institute for Global Health India in November 2017 as Program Head – Health Systems and Equity. She has a doctorate in public health from Johns Hopkins University and has over a decade of research experience in over half a dozen countries and as many Indian states.

From ground breaking studies and record funding announcements, to major staff achievements and exciting new partnerships, here is a look back at some of The George Institute’s biggest stories in 2017:

The George Institute for Global Health India celebrated its 10th Anniversary today at an event, attended by a large range of stakeholders in healthcare research, policy, communication and delivery.

Media release: 
11/12/2017

The NSW Minister for Health and Medical Research, The Honourable Brad Hazzard MP, visited The George Institute, China on 7 December with a health and medical delegation led by the Minister in China as part of the NSW-Guangdong Joint Economic Meeting (JEM) on 5 December. The Secretary of NSW Health, Elizabeth Koff, and Special Envoy to China, Dr Jim Harrowell AM also attended.

"My findings have implications for public health policies in the United Kingdom and possibly developed countries in general - and that is very rewarding." 

The George Institute for Global Health welcomes the appointment of a new board member, Meena Thuraisingham.

Media release: 
21/11/2017
heart failure

The number of people being diagnosed with heart failure in the UK continues to rise as a result of demographic changes common to many developed countries, new research by The George Institute for Global Health at the University of Oxford suggests.

The George Institute for Global Health today received a landmark investment of $24 million from the Australian Government to undertake research to prevent and treat cardiometabolic diseases, which affect seven million Australians and hundreds of millions globally.

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